About M-CORES

The Multi-use Corridors of Regional Economic Significance (M-CORES) program is intended to revitalize rural communities, encourage job creation and provide regional connectivity while leveraging technology, enhancing the quality of life and public safety, and protecting the environment and natural resources. The intended benefits include, but are not limited to, addressing issues such as:

  • Hurricane evacuation
  • Congestion mitigation
  • Trade and logistics
  • Broadband, water and sewer connectivity
  • Energy distribution
  • Autonomous, connected, shared and electric vehicle technology
  • Other transportation modes, such as shared-use nonmotorized trails, freight and passenger rail, and public transit
  • Mobility as a service
  • Availability of a trained workforce skilled in traditional and emerging technologies
  • Protection or enhancement of wildlife corridors or environmentally sensitive areas
  • Protection or enhancement of primary springs protection zones and farmland preservation areas

The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) is assigned with assembling task forces to study three specific corridors:

M CORES logo

How to Participate

Public participation is vital to the M-CORES process, and there are many ways to share your comments or ideas.

  • Attend a meeting. All three task forces will hold public meetings in their respective corridors. We will also hold community open houses to share progress and gather your input. Staff will be available at each open house to answer questions and receive your comments. Check our Calendar of Events for upcoming meetings in your area.
  • Contact us. We want to hear from you. Visit the Contact Us section of this website to ask a question, submit a public comment or request a public record.
  • Sign up for updates. Sign up today to receive news, notices of upcoming meetings and more.

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Sign Up for Updates

FDOT invites you to stay up-to-date on the progress of the M-CORES task forces. Sign up today to receive news, notices of upcoming meetings and public events, and more.

Choose the study area or study areas in which you are interested, or choose Select All to stay informed on all three studies.

Florida has a very broad public records law. Any written communication to or from the Florida Department of Transportation is a public record available to the public and media upon request. Your email communications may be subject to public disclosures. Under Florida law, email addresses are public records. If you do not want your email address released in response to a public records request, do not send electronic mail to this entity.

FAQs

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What is M-CORES?

Governor Ron DeSantis signed Senate Bill 7068 on May 17, 2019, to create the Multi-use Corridors of Regional Economic Significance (M-CORES) Program within the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT). The purpose of the program is to revitalize rural communities, encourage job creation and provide regional connectivity while leveraging technology, enhancing the quality of life and public safety, and protecting the environment and natural resources. The objective of the program is to advance the construction of regional corridors that are intended to accommodate multiple modes of transportation and multiple types of infrastructure.

What are the intended benefits of the program?

The intended benefits of the program include, but are not limited to, addressing issues such as:

  • Hurricane evacuation
  • Congestion mitigation
  • Trade and logistics
  • Broadband, water and sewer connectivity
  • Energy distribution
  • Autonomous, connected, shared and electric vehicle technology
  • Other transportation modes, such as shared-use nonmotorized trails, freight and passenger rail, and public transit
  • Mobility as a service
  • Availability of a trained workforce skilled in traditional and emerging technologies
  • Protection or enhancement of wildlife corridors or environmentally sensitive areas
  • Protection or enhancement of primary springs protection zones and farmland preservation areas
How will these toll roads be “multi-use?”

Although it includes toll roads, the program is intended to accommodate multiple modes of transportation, such as trails, freight and passenger rail, and public transit; and multiple types of infrastructure, such as broadband, water and sewer services.

What areas are included?

The study includes three corridors in the state of Florida:

Study areas are defined at the county level and do not identify specific routes.

Who will evaluate each corridor?

FDOT will perform a thorough project evaluation according to its own rules, policies, and procedures, including a full Project Development and Environment (PD&E) study. Additionally, FDOT will convene a task force to study each multi-use corridor. The task forces will make recommendations to FDOT regarding the potential economic and environmental impacts of the corridor and other factors as specified in the M-CORES legislation. Each task force will include representatives of:

  • The Department of Environmental Protection
  • The Department of Economic Opportunity
  • The Department of Education
  • The Department of Health
  • The Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
  • The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
  • The local water management district(s)
  • A local government official from each local government within a proposed corridor
  • Metropolitan planning organizations
  • Regional planning councils
  • The community (either individuals or members of a nonprofit community organization)
  • Environmental groups
How will M-CORES protect the environment?

In addition to including environmental agencies and advocates on the task forces, the M-CORES legislation specifically requires the task forces to address wildlife habitat, water quality and other environmental issues. The task forces are also expected to consider and recommend innovative concepts to combine right-of-way acquisition with the acquisition of lands or easements to facilitate environmental mitigation or ecosystem, wildlife habitat or water quality protection or restoration. FDOT, in consultation with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, may incorporate those features into each corridor during the project development phase.

Qualifying projects are subject to FDOT’s Efficient Transportation Decision Making (ETDM) process, which is a procedure for reviewing transportation projects to consider potential environmental effects in the planning phase. This process provides stakeholders the opportunity for early input, involvement and coordination. It also provides for the early identification of potential project effects and informs the development of scopes for projects advancing to the Project Development and Environment (PD&E) phase.

Local governments will be involved, too. The legislation requires any local government that has an interchange within its jurisdiction to review the task force’s report and its own local comprehensive plan. Each local government must consider whether the area in and around the interchange contains appropriate land uses and natural resource protections and whether the comprehensive plan should be amended to provide such appropriate uses and protections.

When will the task forces begin?

The Secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation is to appoint the members of each task force by August 1, 2019, and they are expected to begin work soon thereafter.

When will the study end?

Each task force is expected to issue a final report by October 1, 2020. FDOT will perform a project evaluation according to its own rules, policies, and procedures. If feasible, construction is expected to begin no later than December 31, 2022.

Will local residents have an opportunity to provide input?

Yes. Your opinions and ideas are important to us! Each task force will hold a public meeting in every local government jurisdiction in which a project within the corridor is being considered. The task force meetings begin in August 2019. Residents are also encouraged to send us feedback and ideas via email at FDOT.Listens@dot.state.fl.us.

How will projects be funded?

Projects that result from the M-CORES process may be funded in several ways: through Florida’s Turnpike Enterprise revenue bonds, right-of-way and bridge construction bonds, or financing by the Florida Department of Transportation Financing Corporation; by advances from the State Transportation Trust Fund; with funds obtained through the creation of public-private partnerships; or by any combination of these means.

Toll road revenue will be used to pay, build, operate and maintain the roadways.

Highway infrastructure requires routine maintenance, updating and sometimes replacement. Tolls enable projects to be planned and built years before enough tax dollars could be collected to keep up with demand. All revenue from Florida’s Turnpike is reinvested into projects like building new highways or making improvements to existing highways on a statewide basis.

What else is included in the M-CORES legislation?

The legislation that created this program allocates $10 million per year over four years to each of two programs:

  • The Small County Road Assistance Program to assist small county governments in resurfacing or reconstructing county roads
  • The Small County Outreach Program to assist small county governments in repairing or rehabilitating county bridges, paving unpaved roads, addressing road-related drainage improvements, resurfacing or reconstructing county roads, or constructing capacity or safety improvements to county roads

These funds will be used with preference going to projects in counties impacted by hurricanes.

The legislation also allocates $10 million per year over four years to the Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund, which subsidizes a portion of a transportation disadvantaged person’s transportation costs. “Transportation disadvantaged” means persons who cannot transport themselves or purchase transportation to life-sustaining (like shopping or health care) or social activities because of physical or mental disability, income status or age.

Additionally, the legislation creates a construction workforce development program within FDOT as a tool for addressing the current construction labor shortage and provides $2.5 million annually over the next three years to support the program.

Can I submit a question or comment?

FDOT welcomes your questions and comments. Please contact us.

How can I find out more about M-CORES?

You can stay informed about M-CORES by adding your email address to our distribution list.

Where can I find M-CORES procurement information?

For the latest procurement information, please visit FDOT’s M-CORES procurement page.

How can I find out about current and future roadway studies/Project Development and Environment (PD&E) studies in my area?

To learn more about the major current and future PD&E studies please visit FDOT’s Major Projects page.

Who can I contact if I have a question or concern about a construction project in my area?

For more information about projects that could potentially be in your area, please reach out to the FDOT Public Information Office.

Contact Us

Florida has a very broad public records law. Any written communication to or from the Florida Department of Transportation is a public record available to the public and media upon request. Your email communications may be subject to public disclosures. Under Florida law, email addresses are public records. If you do not want your email address released in response to a public records request, do not send electronic mail to this entity. Instead, contact the appropriate office by phone.

Email us at:
FDOT.Listens@dot.state.fl.us



Request a Public Record

The Florida Department of Transportation is committed to handling requests to review or copy public records as quickly and efficiently as possible. Requests for public records can be made by calling us at (850) 414-5265, faxing a request to (850) 414-5264, emailing a request to FDOT.PublicRecords@dot.state.fl.us, or mailing a request to the Office of the General Counsel at 605 Suwannee Street, MS58, Tallahassee, FL 32399-0458. Except for limited statutory exceptions, you are not required to give your name, explain why you are making a request, or submit a request for public records in writing.

Florida law authorizes agencies to recover certain costs associated with responding to public records requests. In order to help us provide you the best response to your request, you should carefully consider what records you want to review or copy. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at (850) 414-5265.